image via Venuelust

image via Venuelust

Its name is no misnomer. The Big Island, otherwise known as the Island of Hawaii, spans over 4,000 square miles. Its size alone makes it larger than all of the other islands that make up the 50th State. It is also surprisingly diverse. For example, you can find all but two of the world's climate zones on the island (yes, it does even snow occasionally in the mountains). The end result for travelers is a place rich in tropical rainforests, lava deserts, cow speckled pastures, frosty alpine slopes, golden beaches and bewitching coves. Quintessential Hawaii is alive and well on the Big Island, making it an ideal destination to spend your honeymoon.

What To Do

The Big Island is a never-ending adventure for nature lovers. The island is teeming with attractions, but the most notable is Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. The park has become one of Hawaii’s must-see sites thanks to one of the world’s most active volcanoes, Kilauea.

Photo from ArtBrom on Flickr

Photo from ArtBrom on Flickr

If you would rather chase waterfalls instead of volcanoes, you can get lost on the Hamakua Coast. The area, northwest of Hilo, is rich in waterfalls, jungles and ocean views. Honeymooning couples will want to spend some time at Akaka Falls State Park along the way. The park features a 10-minute loop trail where you can see Akaka Falls dropping more than 442 feet into a picturesque pool. In addition to the main waterfall, the park also has another 400-foot cascade at the lower end of the trail.

Photo from Bill Ward on Flickr

Photo from Bill Ward on Flickr

Then again, many come to the Big Island to take advantage of its stunning beaches. While the whole island is filled with intriguing coastline, you might want to spend some time on Hapuna Beach. The beach stretches a half-mile and boasts some of the best swimming and snorkeling on the island. Then again, many come to witness the marvel of a black sand beach, particularly Punaluu Beach.

Photo by Frank Wittig on Flickr

Photo by Frank Wittig on Flickr

If nature isn’t quiet your cup of tea, the Big Island has several exciting towns to explore. Hilo is defined by historic buildings. It is also one of the wettest places on the island with an average rainfall of 130 inches per year. On the other hand, Kailua-Kona offers a more commercial tourist town feel with plenty of oceanfront restaurants and sunshine year round.

Where To Stay 

Puakea ranch Hawaii

image via Venuelust

The Big Island features countless resorts and hotels. However, for couples seeking a bit more privacy and romance, Puakea Ranch offers something a bit different. With just four bungalows to choose from, couples are treated to a quiet and private environment at Puakea. The ranch sits on the northern tip of the island, close to the town of Hawi. Far removed from the island’s resorts, Puakea Ranch is surrounded with lush tropical mountains, valleys and untouched beaches.

Puakea Ranch Sunset view from Yoshi's House

image via Venuelust

Guests at the ranch can rest up in fully restored plantation era bungalows, each with free Wi-Fi, television and private concierge service. Couples might appreciate two of those bungalows more than the others. The Miles Away bungalow features a porch with sunset views, a custom Japanese tub and an outdoor plunge pool. The James Cottage, meanwhile, offers an even more intimate setting with its studio layout that allows guests to enjoy both ocean and pasture views.

What To Eat

As honeymooners will learn, the Big Island values its cuisine as much as it values its recreation. Diners are treated to the freshest of ingredients thanks to the deep waters, green pastures and fertile fields on the island. In fact, Hawaii has become quite the culinary destination, welcoming its fair share of creative chefs. You can find a number of high-end restaurants along the Kohala Coast. The Big Island is also rich in roadside stands selling delectable street food and fruits. In particular, visitors will want to head to the Waimea area of the island. Waimea is known for hosting some of the island’s top regional chefs. Many of the farms and ranches in Waimea supply fresh ingredients to the restaurants on the island.

When To Go

Photo by daveynin on Flickr

Photo by daveynin on Flickr

The Big Island is an all-season destination. Honeymooning couples won’t have to worry too much about the weather. However, the moisture is mostly limited to the north and east sides of the island. The south and west enjoy a warmer and drier climate. Some of the hottest months on the island include August and September ,when temperatures can head well above 90F. The Big Island's high season is from mid-November to mid-April. Couples seeking more privacy and fewer crowds can book their honeymoon outside of these busier months.

Your Turn…

Did you honeymoon on the Big Island? Share your favorite experiences on the island with us in the comments below.